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counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
line of mac computers in china, apple is set to bring some of its manufacturing jobs back home to the usa. is this a political move or is this a clear-cut economic manufacturing move? here to discuss is "forbes" columnist and china export gordon chang, the author of "the coming collapse of china." serious question, do you think actual's doing this for politics or economics? >> actually both. but when you look at china, though, their manufacturing days are over. americans are less produmore pr less prone to strike -- >> are you sure american works are less prone to strike? we've reported on this show a whole bunch of strikes, including the hostess twinkie companies, the ports of los angeles and out on the west coast. we have obama in the white house. the unions are going whild here. in all seriousness, i don't think unions are any more placid here than they are in china. >> but in china, workers go out on wildcat strikes all the time. foxconn which manufactures about 97% of apple's products, they've been really subject to labor troubles, from suicides to strikes. so i think appl
think the world will look like. it's fascinating. it shows china on the rise, the west in decline and china overtaking the united states in size of economy by the year 2030. here are the key findings of the new intel report. it's interesting reading. a majority of the world's population by 2030 will be out of poverty for the first time in world history. there will be wars over food and water and natural resores. populations will continue to rise and there will be recurring global economic crises but when you think about this, you think about how far we're going here. you've got asia, china in particular will be dominant. it will be stronger than its been anytime since middleages. there will be no more pax americana as its known. china will be a big driver and india will be growing like china is today. they talk about how the world is changing. it's like no other time since the french revolution. remember in the late 18th century, the industrial revolution, except it's happening more quickly. it's taking a tenth of the time for china and asia to rise quickly. let me read to you som
of santa's route. he follows every new year's. he just was in russia. now he's over the great wall of china. previous to that, he made his way to australia. you can see him flying past the famed opera house there. so he's delivered all of his presents in australia. all of the presents in russia. all the presents in japan, and also south korea, and, of course, now he's busy in china, on his way, of course, over here to the united states. we'll keep you posted. >>> wreaths across america. it's a program that's become part of the healing process for military families around the holidays. today's giving in focus takes a look at a tree farm in maine that helps turn greece into finding peace. >> i know when chris died, we kept thinking about how we were going to remember him. and we kept thinking that his spirit was moving through the trees every time you saw them moving. i seem to be drawn to maine even though i've never lived here. it's pretty amazing. >> we're in the wreath business and have been since 1971. columbia falls is a little town in coastal washington county. the perfect little count
to care for the baby they adopted from china, and they were hoping to adopt another child, but finances were tight and so on. now of course they can afford to do all this. but they seem very decent, i say ordinary, i don't mean ordinary in any kind of negative way, i just mean regular americans. >> yes. they are very grounded. they have strong bonds with their family. they really enjoy their family. they will definitely take care of their family now. >> let's play a little clip, this is of cindy, who bought the ticket, at the press conference earlier. >> i didn't have my glasses and i was thinking is that the right numbers, is that the right numbers? and i was shaking and i called my husband, i said i think i'm having a heart attack, god blessed us with this. and for some reason, he put it in our hands. i think to make sure that it goes to the right things. and -- but we were blessed before we ever won this. >> how do you guys find out about this, walt? >> since we're pretty familiar in the community, several people in the community started texting us about, oh, 9:00 that morning, and y
. if you look at the facts, 32% of our manufacturing base has been gutted and sold to china, india, any foreign country that has cheap labor. the top patriotic american companies are parking their profits and offshore accounts so they do not have to pay a fair share of their taxes. the bottom line is since the late '70s, the wealthiest 2% in this country are making 25 times their wealth that they made a black -- back then. there are only paying 40% more in taxes. this country is doomed if we do not start putting terrace of the imports coming into this country. the republican party is selling you an outright lie. thank you. host: let's show you a facebook posting. the economist and professor at the university of maryland will be with us and about 25 minutes or so. he will take your calls and give you his economic outlook for 2013. he has written a lot on the matter. from west virginia, independent. caller: is, sir. i would just like to say that i am not very optimistic above the future of the united states right now. we are in so much that it is pathetic. our budget is way over. this pre
but also offer a great opportunity. you see, what i find in africa today is that china has an increasing presence on that continent. china has a plan when it comes to the future of africa. america does not. that's why i'm going to offer as an amendment to the tag bill, which is currently pending before the senate, the american jobs through greater exports to africa act. my partners on the bill are senator chris coons, senator ben cardin, john boozman and mary landrieu, as well as support in the house from representative chris smith. at the heart of this bill is the creation of jobs in america. exporting more goods to africa will help create jobs here. every $1 billion in exports supports over 5,000 jobs. i believe we can increase exports from the united states to africa by 200% in real dollars over the next ten years, and we can't wait any longer. if there are some who say africa is so backward and so far behind, what is it in the united states they can afford to buy if they even wanted to, that is old thinking. let me give you some new reality. in the past ten years six of the world's f
to help china, and china is the biggest abortion country in the world. when you throw all this into a big mixture, you cannot blame the gun. host: thank you for the call and comment. a bitter fight had on gun control, according to the washington post. we are following some of the options on what is next. speaker boehner is confronting a political cliff over the budget track is, putting out that the speaker's leadership and legacy remained at stake. they point out that in a show of support, house leader eric cantor. at a news conference with the speaker in a call to extend the tax rates. some have urged congressman tom price of georgia to challenge john deere for the job. much more on what is next for the fiscal cliff. one week before we reach that point. the deadline is december 31, january 1. the president is in hawaii. the house and senate are also in set -- in session this week. elliot engel, weighing in on a number of topics, including rumors that former republican senator chuck a bill could be nominated as defense secretary. you heard from the president on friday as he nominated sena
or the executive branch can nullify a statute passed by congress. >>> no secret china is coming on strong as a global power. but a new u.s. intelligence report predicts how far and fast china will move. >> the national intelligence council says by 2030, just 17 years from now, china will likely have passed the u.s. to become the world's largest economy. the report says that overall, asia will top north america and europe with population, military spending and investing in technology. >> and one of the bright spots for the u.s., we are expected to become energy independent and the world's largest exporter by the year 2030. people talk about china and their booming economy over there, and this quantifies just how fast they are coming on. pretty amazing. >> the world's population is projected to rise to 8.3 billion from 7.1 billion. and demand for food will go up 35%, and demand for water, 40% more than current water supplies, making water a likely cause of regional conflict, particularly in south asia and the middle east. water and food. there's not going to be enough for us. >> what a brig
sectors? >> first of all before we ring the death bell on manufacturing, u.s. is above china. we are seeing a resurgence of factory jobs, guess where. >> gregg: southeast. >> why. >> gregg: right to work states. >> businesses don't want to move to places where unions are. in those southeast states, union membership tends to be half what it is on the national achblg which is only 12% right now. even though we see that unemployment is lower in right to work states, but wages are lower, as well. that is kind the tradeoff but businesses want to go there. we are seeing companies from china coming in into the u.s.. >> gregg: i bmw, hyundai, honda and you got american companies, g.e., boeing, apple, michelin, they like that southeastern region because that is where the unions aren't. final quick question, if congress fails to strike a deal it will get a whole lot worse? >> the cbo which is supposed to be non-partisan we're going into a double-dip recession. a lost taxes. you look at your paycheck, the first one in january you are going to see a lot less money. >> gregg: it's not just th
to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that it leads to higher wages, that it leads to marginally -- >> but what's wrong with giving people the freedom to
interesting situation here. >> that's like jeffrey saying kind oft praising china recently because they can make some good business decisions for themselves, so the whole system might be somewhat admirable. they're always joking when they say something outrageous. i think they're revealing in many ways what they really think. it wasn't too many years ago, bill, that you and i were talking abouter harry's comments about condoleeza rice and even colin powell where they live in the house ofen the master. >> bill: right. >> he wasn't joking then. you know, he maybe overstated a little bit for him. >> bill: look. nobody cares about harry anyway. >> that song is in my head. you're ruining the christmas season, the banana boat song. >> bill: i like that song. >> would you sing it for us? >> i used him not because he has credibility and that he's somebody that people listen to. but to give you an example of what is being said in the salons, at the huffington post. there arese people going you knw what? if you oppose president obama now anden you oppose the secular progressive agenda, we're going to
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
there is large u.s. presence. south korea is calling for more u.s. sanctions. the most important, china, they are saying want a moderate and prudent response. may well go to the u.n. security council this morning. back to you. martha: so how important is it for north korea's missile regime, missile program i should say they were able to launch this weapon successfully? they have seen several failures in the past? >> reporter: well it is a major scientific achievement if you look at it on that level even though a lot of their people are starving in the country. from what the experts are saying they're still a long way off from being able to fire a ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead. there is problems with the heat from reentry, things like that. but it's, they are moving towards that ballistic missile which could threaten in the future the u.s. mainland. but it does seem a political success for the new leader, kim jong-un, this young new leader. he pushed for this rocket to be tested and for once it has been successful. back to you. martha: david, thank you very much. we'll have mo
/11 and in syria and china with the 22 children who were disfigured and cut within less than a week. and then in syria, the 47 people that have been killed by snipers and the thousands that have been killed that our children and women. you can see them on youtube right now. i want to understand why you diminished someones comment with the purpose. rather than being critical, the reality is a horrible situation that happened. i do not defend anything that happened at the school, but the individual data has a $100 shotgun or less -- and individual with a $100 shotgun or less, the situation would have been worse. in 1994 when you lost the assault weapons ban, you also lost the house for tenure. i will stop -- for 10 years. i will invite the listeners to look at the china situation a week ago where years and figures were cut off. guest: as you know, we do live in a society where we do feel protected and represented in government i think that is something that is diminished and there is a sense of government for us. and but we do have a representative democracy and it is something that w
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video clip] >> i share the view of the majority leader. we had a good meeting at the white house. we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself a in the hopes that we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make to his conference. we will be working hard to try to see if we can get there in the next 24 hours. i am hopeful and optimistic. >> we are talking about the senate negotiating a fiscal could deal on -- but one of the stories of in the paper comes from the baltimore sun with the president of in there headline saying the president modestly optimistic. let's see what the thoughts are of the viewers and listeners this morning. pamela from new jersey on the line for democrats. are you optimistic about the fiscal clefts deal? caller:
with nerve gas. that's not a good place for even russia and china to be at the end of the day, jon. jon: want to turn your attention to pearl harbor day, general. it is, it is upon us again. i just wanted to get your thoughts on this day. >> you know, in a way we can look at pearl harbor as a sort of cautionary tale, jon. over the last 70 or 80 years, this nation has almost always been surprised by our enemies, whether it's nerve, pearl harbor and the other various -- korea, all the various wars we've gone to. and as a nation what's important here is to prevent wars by being prepared for wars. and not to try to pick any particular region of the world to anticipate when, where, how and why a conflict will be started. we're not very good at that as a nation, jon. jon: let's hope we can learn. general bob scales, good to have you on. >> thank you, jon. heather: we are getting a new snapshot of the health of the economy right now. according to the labor department, unemployment fell to 7.7% in november after adding 146,000 jobs last month. but the dip in the jobless rate due mostly to the fact th
he came from, back to china, but his home country, our good old buddies, the chinese, refused to take him back. they didn't want him, and so they stalled and stalled and stalled, and over those three years of chinese stalling and gave him the run-around, chen was eventually free and free to kill and kill he did. mr. speaker, this tragedy is not an isolated phenomena. flafflet, other americans have died as a result -- unfortunately, other americans have died as a result of a gaping hole in the immigration system. it's no secret that everybody believes our immigration system is broken. fixing it down the road will be complex and complicated, but there's some things we can do about immigration right now to fix specific problems and here's one of these. currently, mr. speaker, thousands of criminal aliens are in our country, just like chen, that have committed a crime, gone to prison, our immigration worked to order them deported but their country won't take them back. they refuse to do so, so those countries stall and delay and eventually never take back their outlaws. so by law when the
. host: the stories are "the in- sourcing boom" and "mr. china comes to america. both can be found at theatlantic.com. thanks for joining us. we will take you live to the house floor. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 19, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable daniel webster to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. res. 624, relative to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of ohio. -- hawaii. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of
as in china we went and helped people in small businesses that have been wiped out temporarily to be able to come back, our fishing people deserve emergency assistance to tide them over and help them through this most critical time. i would turn to the senator from alaska and the senator from new hampshire, and ask what that means to the state of new hampshire if she might share with us. mrs. shaheen: my friend from massachusetts understands the challenges we have in new hampshire, as does senator whitehouse from rhode island, because, in fact, fishing is one of the oldest industries that we have in new england. and new hampshire it dates back over 400 years. because we have a much smaller coastline than massachusetts and rhode island, we have a smaller -- smaller group of people who earn their living through fishing, but they have smaller boats, and therefore they're more affected by some of the fishing regulations and some of the adverse weather conditions that have affected fishing. about 90% of the fishing that new hampshire's fishermen do is for cod and cod is the species that has be
an issue out of china, but we lost a lot of jobs to southern states in the united states. so we're absolutely going to market -- michigan, there is no better work force in the country than michigan. i'd argue no better work force in the world than michigan. we'll welcome business with open arms, bring those opportunities to our state. we have a beautiful state, fantastic people. >> brian: mr. speaker, thank you for joining us. best of luck for everyone to calm down in michigan and look ahead. thanks so much. >> great to be with you. thanks. >> brian: the number one country song for the last two weeks running. ♪ baby you a song ♪ you make me want to roll my windows down ♪ ♪ and croon. >> brian: they've been here since 2:00 o'clock in the morning. they'll be here live. let's check in with bill hemmer who also got here at 2:00 o'clock in the morning and is in a rock'n'roll band. >> i'm looking for the peanut but ther and jelly later today. didn't we have that last year? >> brian: yes, you d. bring your own jiffy. >> will do. thank you. breaking news on the economy. what the
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22